The Adventures of JAGO AND LITEFOOT

Big Finish’s Doctor Who plays have proved enormously successful…but the company has had more modest success with other franchises, leading to them to occasionally look to Doctor Who for something that will tie into the franchise…even as it allows them to stretch creatively. Which led them to…Jago & Litefoot. A couple of characters first — and last — seen in the perennially well-regarded 1970s TV serial Dr Who: The Talons of Weng-Chiang.

Set in an archetypical Victorian London of fog and back streets, Professor George Litefoot (Trevor Baxter) is a police forensic pathologist and Henry Gordon Jago (Christopher Benjamin) a bombastic theatre impresario with an amazing ardour for alliteration who aided the Doctor and Leela on that adventure. On a whim, Big Finish reunited the actors for one of their Companion Chronicles enhanced audio books (The Mahogany Murders)…and were so struck by the potential, and the genuine chemistry between the actors, and how easily they re-inhabited their roles (after 30 years!) that they decided to launch them into a series of full cast audio plays, with the unlikely duo investigating strange events and mysterious goings on — from werewolves to psychics.

Funnily, despite the inherent humorousness of the characters — particularly Jago (Litefoot is played more straight) — leading one to think they were intended as an answer to the popular audio comic-thrillers of The Scaryfiers (which BF had begun distributing for Cosmic Hobo Productions) the plots are actually serious. There’s lots of humour and comedy, but basically arising from the characters and to leaven the drama, rather than as an out-and-out parody. And it works tremendously well, succeeding as being both like Dr. Who (in that they are thrillers involving steampunk sci-fi and the supernatural) yet with their own tone and flavour, most notably because the heroes are more “everymen.” The lead characters are the stories’ anchor, delightfully realized and exceptionally well performed by Benjamin and Baxter who you really would assume have been playing these roles for years, they seem so comfortable with them and with each other (indeed, their performances are even better than in the old TV serial!) The humour is well captured, the Victorian flavour (in themes, dialogue and period detail — Oscar Wilde even guest stars in one story) nicely evoked, and the plots interesting enough to keep you listening. An unexpected success.

BF has presented them in a series of “series” (or seasons) each of generally 4 one hour dramas, sold as boxed sets, each series usually made up of relatively stand alone adventures linked by a sub-plot/recurring nemesis to form arcs of four episodes. At this point I’ve heard Series I, Series II, and Series IV and all are generally highly enjoyable. I also listened to Dr. Who: The Companion Chronicles: The Mahogany Murders, which is more an enhanced reading by the actors as opposed to a full cast dramatizations (though acts as essentially the first episode in the Series I arc). The characters have also guest starred in some of BF’s Dr. Who audio plays, including the 6th Doctor stories Voyage to Venus and Voyage to the New World — both quite good, though with Voyage to Venus getting the nod as the more fun, while Voyage to the New World boasts the more ambitious plotting.