Ring for Jeeves

P.G. Wodehouse’s comic/satire stories of the British upper classes, as personified by oblivious Bernie Wooster and his smarter, but reserved, butler Jeeves, have seen a few audio/radio versions (as well as TV). The novel Ring for Jeeves (itself I believe based on a play, Come On, Jeeves) was adapted into 2 one-hour episodes for BBC Radio in 2014. It’s a little atypical in that Jeeves has been lent out to another oblivious gentleman, Bill, so it’s not about Wooster — the only Jeeves story not involving Wooster (though Bill is essentially the same character type, so perhaps the switch was to allow more plot freedom since the status quo doesn’t have to be maintained by the end of the story).

It’s a manor house comedy full of exaggeratedly typical British gentry (tally ho!) living on the cusp of the end of the Age of Aristocracy (here the 1950s) as they are having to get real jobs and deal with dwindling fortunes. Bill is in the process of trying to sell his estate (possibly to a wealthy American woman) while also dealing with the misadventures resulting from an ill-fated foray into being a racing bookie (after he ends up owing more money to a winner than he actually has). And there is a bit of a “play” vibe to it, as most of the action takes place on the estate over just a few days.

Perhaps the curious thing about it is that some of the actors are often associated more with drama, yet the story itself is pure light-hearted farce. But that results in a mixed effect. On one hand, you could argue the characters and dialogue demand a little more camp and OTT…on the other hand, maybe it lends the characters and situations a little more grounding, so that the whole doesn’t float away on a cloud of total frivolity. By that I don’t mean that the actors aren’t playing it as comedy — they are! — it’s just the characters can still seem a bit like, well, people, too. As such, maybe not as funny as it could be, but it’s maybe more slyly amusing and engaging than you might expect it to be. And where you have to pay attention to the dialogue to get the jokes.

Martin Jarvis stars as Jeeves and Jamie Bamber as Bill, with Rufus Sewell, Joanne Whaley, and American actress Glenne Headly in the cast. It’s a good cast, with Sewell in particular delightfully atypical as an aging, oblivious, aristocrat. Of course, I can’t say I’m a devoted fan of the Wodehouse/Jeeves stories in general, but I did enjoy this as a kind of breezy, amusing romp.

Air Force One

2013 one hour BBC Radio drama (though with an American cast) written by Christopher Lee (not the veteran actor) and directed by Martin Jarvis (who is the actor) about the immediate hours following the John F. Kennedy assassination, focusing on Vice President Lyndon Johnson (Stacy Keach), Jackie Kennedy (Glenne Headly), Secret Service people, etc. It‘s based, apparently, on public knowledge, unearthed inquiry reports and — of course — the writer’s speculation (allowing for a lot of deliberate ambiguity — so there are hints of some “conspiracy”…without quite pointing fingers).

Well made (with a particularly good turn from Keach) and surprisingly atmospheric and effective, maybe because despite the JFK assassination much recycled in stories, this pulls back the curtain on events not necessarily the focus of other dramatizations (or, at least, referenced but not depicted). More a taught political drama than a thriller (as mentioned, not quite committing itself to any POV, with Johnson seeming both sympathetic and self-serving). A kind of grounds eye view of events, as the characters themselves are only learning about the events as they transpire. And, despite the familiarity of the story, compelling.